Postcards to target new business for Pike

By Peter Becker, Managing Editor, THURSDAY, APRIL 03, 2014

A new economic marketing strategy is underway in Pike County, seeking manufacturers that will benefit from what are described as Pike’s unique advantages for business.
Pike County Economic Development Authority (EDA) is sending a colorful series of four postcards to a list of 570 companies, hoping to spark a flame of interest that will mutually benefit the company and the people of Pike.

A new economic marketing strategy is underway in Pike County, seeking manufacturers that will benefit from what are described as Pike’s unique advantages for business.

Pike County Economic Development Authority (EDA) is sending a colorful series of four postcards to a list of 570 companies, hoping to spark a flame of interest that will mutually benefit the company and the people of Pike.

Michael Sullivan, Executive Director of Pike EDA, gave an update to the Pike County Board of Commissioners April 2nd. The County is supporting the strategy and funding the costs of the marketing program.

Chairman Richard Caridi cited the new effort as “a change in philosophy.” Rather than pursue a centralized business park with sewer and water facilities provided, they are looking for businesses that do not require the same degree of infrastructure, and locate them at various places across Pike.

The new campaign was detailed at a special dinner program hosted by the EDA on February 18th at Ehrhardt’s Waterfront Resort. Approximately 130 people attended.

New York and New Jersey-based companies are being targeted by the postcard campaign. Sullivan has quoted statistics revealing the economic advantages of locating to Pike County.

Among those attributes is Pennsylvania’s relative low tax rates and regulation; Pennsylvania’s ranking of business climate relative to New York and New Jersey; costs of labor, utilities and other expenses and high quality of life in Pike County. Sullivan also included, “the idea that we really want and value new businesses in Pike County; you are NOT just another unidentified commercial taxpayer here.”

The cards will be mailed two weeks apart to the same firms. Postcards, he said, are more likely to grab attention and less likely than a sealed envelope to be simply discarded. While the first card might generate no response, subsequent mailings are designed to gradually get the message across, that Pike County, PA is open for business.

The first card speaks of Pike’s highly qualified work force, great quality of life and lower costs that will aid in the company’s bottom line.

Card number two takes a quick look at comparative tax rates and how a business listed as an LLC, Sun-Chapter “S”, a sole proprietorship or partnership, will do better in Pennsylvania than in New York or New Jersey. Data from the Tax Foundation is cited, showing how tax rates for these businesses, individual tax rates, sales taxes and per capita property taxes are all lowest in Pennsylvania.

The third card talks about Pike County’s lower utility rates and invites the company to send their last bill.

Card number four shows a truck heading into Pike on the interstate, with a big green exit sign declaring, “Opportunities Ahead!” and the motto, “Pike County, Pennsylvania… Where BIG plans merge with BIGGER opportunities.”